Undergrad Research Delta Zeta


Our sisters are involved all across campus. However, an interesting aspect many don't hear about is the research our sisters do. Below are a few of our sisters and their unique opportunities!


Gabriela Pinero-Crespo (Senior PC18) I do research on the role of the placenta in preterm birth. Specifically I study the function of a gene family called Pregnancy Specific Glycoproteins which are important to a successful pregnancy, and have been implicated as being different in adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preeclampsia and placenta acreeta spectrum. I originally got involved in research on this topic because pregnancy is fascinating to me and I am passionate about women’s health, especially how adverse pregnancy outcomes disproportionately affect some minority groups. I am part of the University Scholar’s Program at UF, and I will be presenting my research at a symposium in April. Undergraduate research has taught me a lot of lab skills and qualities such as adaptability and flexibility. It has further fueled my scientific curiosity in the field of medicine which I will be further exploring in medical school next year!


Brooke Bryant (Senior PC20) I volunteer in the Upper Airway Dysfunction Lab where trials are conducted at Fixel Institute for Neurological Diseases. I helped to conduct research trials looking at various motor functions such as cough and swallow of those with Parkinson's Disease. In these trials, I help assemble equipment, record data, and analyze airflow data. This research interests me because I plan to get my Master's degree in Speech Language Pathology, and work with adults who are recovering from strokes and have impairments in their swallowing function. It has impacted my college career because the field I wanted to go into was so broad, and it gave me more of a focused population that I would like to work with one day. Overall, it also helped me to make connections to a lot of things that I was learning in my classes and allowed me to make connections with those working in the field.


Gabriella Peburn (Sophomore PC20) I am studying Aerospace Engineering. I do research in the Machine Intelligence Lab (MIL) at UF in MAE-C. I get to design parts in CAD for a national competition building Subjugator 8. This research has allowed me to explore my field and work with a team of passionate engineers like me. I also work with a student lead design team called Swamp Launch Rocket Team. This team competes in a NASA SL competition annually designing and manufacturing a rocket that launches a different payload each competition. This has given me the insight of what it is like to work on a full scale project and real rocket launch.


Julia White (Sophomore PC20) I am currently doing research in the biomedical engineering building on campus. I am studying muscle atrophy in cancer patients and various methods which can help slow and prevent this from occurring. I am currently looking at the different effects Ursolic acid has on cancerous tumors within mice. So far, I have found that this seems to slow the process, but I am still during the study and have more to learn. When originally looking for research to get involved in, this lab stood out to me due the research being done involving cancer. A few years ago, one of my biggest role models and someone who I saw as a second mom passed away from cancer. Ever since then I knew I wanted to somehow be involved in working with cancer. Being involved in this research has made my college experience more meaningful because I am a part of something that is helping more than just the people around me, or even in Gainesville. I hope to one day find a way to ease the pain and effect cancer has on patients and their family's or maybe even find a cure.


Leah Golberg (Sophomore PC21) I am a research volunteer within Dr. Cousin's lab, which is a lab that studies the understanding of the biological significance of zinc through mutant mouse models. As a research volunteer, I help out in any way that they need! Whether it is labeling tubes for an upcoming experiment, doing genotyping for a new set of mouse tails, or preparing the gel mixture for gel electrophoresis, I do whatever is of help to making their jobs smoother! It has been an eye opening experience to be performing such hands-on tasks, and I learn something new each day. It was extremely difficult to locate a research position, but once I spoke to Dr. Cousins, I knew that this was the right lab for me!


With Love,

Delta Zeta